Weather Alert

The Latest: Dorian’s Projected Path On Track For Carolinas

Governor Henry McMaster issued an executive order declaring a state of emergency and urges South Carolinians to prepare for the possibility of Hurricane Dorian impacting the state.  Click link below to look at the press conference.

SCEMD Live Feed – https://youtu.be/fZV4gMYErmc

To help facilitate the evacuation, McMaster has also ordered lane reversals on multiple South Carolina highways, including Interstate 26 west from Charleston to Columbia, in addition to US 278 in Hilton Head. The lane reversals will also begin at noon on Monday, September 2nd.

Hurricane Dorian gave hints of what lies ahead for the Carolinas coast on Labor Day, when the storm lashed “incessantly” at the Bahamas with 165 mph winds.

Forecasters continue to project the storm will reach the Orlando area of Florida Monday afternoon, then begin following the East Coast toward North Carolina’s Outer Banks.

A potential landfall site continues to elude the National Hurricane Center, suggesting the storm could batter the East Coast for days as it passes at a sluggish 1 mph.

 

 

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The slower it moves, the more wind and rain will pummel the Carolinas coast, forecasters say. Currently, experts predict 5 to 10 inches of rain in the two Carolinas, with isolated areas of 15 inches.

Rain in the 2-to-4 inch range is expected in the central and western parts of the Carolinas, according to Weather.gov.

The rain will likely cause “minor or modern flood stages” in the Cape Fear River, Black River, Northeast Cape Fear river and Waccamaa River, according to the National Weather Service.

“Long-term concerns (include) potential for flooding rain, storm surge, tornadoes and damaging winds, especially Wednesday and Thursday,” said the National Weather Service based out of Wilmington. “Tropical storm force winds could develop as early as Wednesday morning for northeast S.C. and Wednesday into Thursday morning for southeast N.C.”

The storm was causing devastation in the Bahamas Monday. As much as 30 inches of rain was predicted in isolated areas, with 200 mph wind gusts and storm surge 23 feet above normal creating destructive waves, reported the National Hurricane Center. Storm damage is expected to be extreme, experts say.

Updated: 9:45am 9/2/19 – Get2KnowNeek


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